World Dairy Diary

Cow’s Match WarmFront Milk Replacer Introduced

Land O’Lakes Animal Milk Products introduces Cow’s Match® WarmFront™ calf milk replacer, formulated with a unique combination of carbohydrates correctly balanced for when temperatures moderate.

In warm weather conditions, calves’ energy requirements for maintenance are reduced. Transitioning to WarmFront™ calf milk replacer results in greater feed efficiency and bottom line potential. Cow’s Match®WarmFront™ calf milk replacer also provides the most optimal protein-to-energy ratio milk replacer when cold stress is no longer a factor.

Cow’s Match® WarmFront™ and ColdFront™ calf milk replacer formulas represent a new way to approach calf nutrition. “With the introduction of WarmFront™ calf milk replacer, dairy producers can now offer a full potential milk replacer program formulated for the calf’s environment,” says Dr. Tom Earleywine, technical services director for Land O’Lakes Animal Milk Products. “Seasonal feeding is the ideal approach to calf nutrition.”

In cooler temperatures, calves require more dietary energy for maintenance of body condition, optimal growth and immune function. Cow’s Match® ColdFront™ calf milk replacer helps address periods of cold stress. With the addition of WarmFront™, this two-phase system of feeding is designed to be more cost-efficient in meeting the calf’s needs for full potential growth and future productivity potential.

Feeding a calf to its full potential requires getting the right amount of nutrition delivered in the calf’s diet. Intake is most often the limiting factor. More frequent daily feedings, feeding higher amounts of milk replacer, and automatic feeders are excellent ways to deliver full potential feeding. Cow’s Match® WarmFront™ and ColdFront™ calf milk replacers are ideally suited for any full potential feeding program.

Cow’s Match® WarmFront™ formula calf milk replacer should be transitioned into the calf feeding program when seasonally cool weather conditions subside. WarmFront™ features all-milk protein, an enhanced fatty acid profile, L-carnitine, and Digestarom® to optimize intake. WarmFront™ is also available with ClariFly® Larvicide and Bovatec®.

Source: Land O’Lakes Animal Milk Products Company

Download images at:

Collegiate Dairy Leaders from U.S. & Canada Converge in Fort Wayne

PrintThe Dairy Challenge Academy and contest will bring 280 students from 38 college dairy programs to Fort Wayne, Ind., April 4-6. This North American event – hosted by Purdue University, Michigan State University and The Ohio State University – is the largest gathering of collegiates pursuing a dairy career.

Students will converge in Fort Wayne from all corners of the U.S. and two Canadian provinces. These students are training for careers in the dairy industry, as farmers, researchers, educators, financial analysts, nutritionists, farm service providers and veterinarians.

Collegiate participants will visit six dairy farms in Indiana, Michigan and Ohio, to learn how to help farmers evaluate and adapt their management to optimize success and care for animals. Also at Dairy Challenge, industry professionals will present cutting-edge research, new programs and career opportunities to students.

North American Intercollegiate Dairy Challenge® (NAIDC) is fully funded through generous support by 130 agribusinesses and dairy farms. Dairy Challenge started 13 years ago through cooperation between universities, dairy producers and agribusinesses. The event expanded in 2013 with the first-ever Academy, which allowed more students to participate, network and gain skills. This year, about 130 students will compete in the national contest, and 150 students will participate in the Academy.

The tri-state area has a rich history with Dairy Challenge. The 2013 national event was also held in Fort Wayne, and Michigan State hosted the first two national contests in East Lansing in 2002 and 2003. Purdue University and The Ohio State University organized the Midwest regional events in 2008 and 2010, respectively.

“Dairy Challenge has provided a splendid opportunity for our students to integrate what they learn in classes with real-world situations, use problem-solving skills and network with leaders in the dairy industry,” states Maurice Eastridge, 2014 event chair and professor at Ohio State.

“This program has become a critical activity in teaching efforts at Purdue – and other universities – because it transforms the lives of excellent dairy students,” adds Dr. Michael M. Schutz, Professor of Animal Sciences at Purdue.

At Dairy Challenge, each team of students puts textbook knowledge to the ultimate test – consulting for an actual dairy. Teams inspect an operating dairy, analyze farm data and ask questions of farm owners. Then each team develops recommendations, which will be presented to farm owners and a panel of five judges. At a concluding banquet, eight college teams will be announced as award winners, meaning their recommendations most closely match those of the official judges.

Supporters can follow the student activity through posts and photos on Facebook and @DairyChallenge on Twitter.

“Ohio State, Purdue and Michigan State are pleased to team up and once again host the 2014 national Dairy Challenge,” continues Eastridge. “This area is blessed with strong dairy programs at these three universities and strong industry leadership and support. Hosting Dairy Challenge is truly an opportunity to showcase the Midwest and help develop tomorrow’s dairy leaders.”

Western Regional Dairy Challenge Results

2013_ws_photo09Sixty-one students from seven western US and one Canadian university traveled to Everett, Washington for the 8th annual Western Regional Dairy Challenge on February 28 – March 2, 2013.

The Western Regional Dairy Challenge is an innovative, three-day educational competition designed to prepare students for dairy careers. Working in mixed-university teams of five or six students, participants assessed all aspects of a working dairy farm, including facilities, nutrition, financials, reproduction, and animal health. Students collaborated on a 20-minute team presentation that detailed their observations and suggestions to a panel of judges. Teams were ranked based on how well their evaluations matched the judges’ evaluations of the dairy operation.

First place teams, which were named for Washington counties:
Team 4 King: Karessa Mast, California Polytechnic State University – San Luis Obispo; Josina Kasper, University of Idaho; Amy Nelson, Washington State University; Marissa Montez, California State University – Fresno; Jonathan Holub, Texas A & M University

Team 6 Thurston: Emma Shoaf, Utah State University; Melisa Stilson, University of Idaho; Micah DeGroot, California Polytechnic State University – San Luis Obispo; Kayla Nielsen, University of Alberta; Trevor Slegers, California State University – Fresno

Team 5 Pierce: Beverly Shirts, University of Idaho; Jami Lady, California State University – Fresno; Anna Gibson, Washington State University; Jared DeGroot, California Polytechnic State University – San Luis Obispo; Lindsay Simmons, Utah State University

Second place teams:
Team 11 Pacific: Josh Veenendaal, California State University – Fresno; Hannah Symonds, Washington State University; James Weber, California Polytechnic State University – San Luis Obispo; Cierra Olmstead, University of Idaho; Jacob Miller, Utah State University

Team 7 Lewis: Briana Arnold, Washington State University; Rob Diepersloot, California Polytechnic State University – San Luis Obispo; Leonardo DeLeon, California State University – Fresno; Brianna Williams, University of Idaho; Shelby Froland, University of Alberta

Team 9 Klikitat: Karly Nieuwkoop, California State University – Fresno; Kelli Carstensen, California Polytechnic State University – San Luis Obispo; Anna Haines, Texas A & M University; Jessica Reynolds, University of Idaho; Boyd Funk, Washington State University; Dallin Buttars, Utah State University

Source: Western Regional Dairy Challenge

Cheese was Ancient Superfood

Ancient cheese-making started at least 7,000 years ago according to a new paper published in the journal, Nature. Turning milk into cheese was a way for our ancestors to guarantee they had a source of nutrition if their crops failed.

Melanie Salque is the paper’s lead author and a chemist at Bristol University in England. She says some of the first clues of Neolithic cheese-making were a bunch of strange clay vessels unearthed by archaeologists in the 1970s in Northern Europe. “They were very peculiar because they had very small holes in them,” says Salque.

Peter Bogucki, a Princeton archaeologist who dug up these pots, says they baffled him and his colleagues. Some thought the sieves might have been used to hold hot coals, or strain honey, or prepare beer. But Bogucki wondered if maybe they had something to do with cheese.

For decades there was no way to prove his pots were ancient cheese strainers. Now new techniques have finally allowed researchers to analyze residue that had seeped into the clay. And they found that its chemical signature matched cow’s milk.

The simple ancient cheese was an important step in the development of modern civilization. For people who were just beginning to leave hunting behind and beginning to rely on crops that often failed, dairy products had the potential to get them the nutrition they needed. And they were a food source that didn’t require killing highly prized livestock.

“Milk is a superfood — it’s probably the ultimate superfood,” says Mark Thomas, a evolutionary geneticist at University College London who has studied the DNA of these early cheese makers. But he says Neolithic Europeans had a problem — like most modern humans, they were lactose intolerant.

“Very few or none of the people at that time would have been able to digest the sugar in milk,” says Thomas.

But the process of making cheese removes a lot of this sugar — the lactose. It would have been dissolved in the whey and drained off by those ancient cheese strainers so the farmers could get their daily dose of dairy without the intestinal problems. Richard Evershed, a chemist at the University of Bristol in the U.K. and another author on the study, has found milk residues in pottery shards from southwestern Libya, which suggests prehistoric people were also producing yogurt in the same period.

“Milk gave us something — some extra edge in terms of survival,” says Thomas.

And that edge meant we had more time and energy to improve farming methods, invent new tools, develop cooking techniques, and eventually perfect the cheese blintz.

Source: NPR’s The Salt

Select Sires Partners with Heatime System

Select Sires and SCR Dairy Inc. have announced a new partnership to market the Heatime system for herd health management and heat detection, providing even more herd health monitoring options for dairy producers.

Heatime features the only rumination monitoring system in the world in addition to heat detection for a comprehensive insight into cow health.

“It is Select Sires’ goal to provide our customer-owners with the most innovative herd management tools available,” says Lyle Kruse, vice president, U.S. market development for Select Sires. “Heatime is a great complement to our Select Detect™heat detection system.”

SCR Dairy Inc. is a leading developer of advanced technologies for dairy farms. Over 2 million cows on more than 15,000 farms around the world are monitored using SCR’s collar tags, while their technology touches over 12 million cows worldwide, making SCR the global leader in advanced solutions for cow monitoring.

Heatime combines one-of-a-kind rumination monitoring with accurate heat detection, allowing dairy producers unmatched access to information about cow health, nutrition, reproduction and comfort. This precise data allows for better individual and whole-herd management because health and reproductive problems are identified early and can be solved more quickly.

Source: Select Sires Inc.

Northeast Dairy Challenge Results

University of Maine hosted the 10th annual Northeast Regional Dairy Challenge which drew 105 students from nine northeast colleges and two Canadian universities to Waterville, Maine, on November 1-3, 2012.

The Northeast Regional Dairy Challenge is an innovative, three-day educational competition designed to prepare students for dairy careers. Working in mixed-university teams of four or five students, participants assessed all aspects of a working dairy farm, including facilities, nutrition, financials, reproduction, animal health and much more. Students collaborated on a 20-minute team presentation that detailed their observations and suggestions to a panel of judges and participating farm families. Teams were ranked as platinum, gold or silver based on how well their evaluations matched the judges’ evaluations of the dairy operation. The objective of this evaluation process is to create a real-life situation that stresses teamwork, communication and professionalism.

Teams, which were named after top sponsors of the Northeast Regional Dairy Challenge, were ranked as follows:
· Don Rogers Platinum (highest honors) – Merck Animal Health and Farm Credit System.
· Platinum – Cargill Animal Nutrition, Northeast Ag and Feed Alliance, Shur-Gain USA, APC, Inc. and Novartis Animal Health
· Gold – Farm Credit Northeast Ag Enhancement Program, Farm Credit of Maine, Holtz-Nelson Dairy Consultants, New England Jersey Breeders Association and Phoenix Feeds & Nutrition
· Silver – Elanco Animal Health, AgChoice & MidAtlantic Farm Credit, Select Sires, ABS Global, Alltech, CIDEC, Dairy One, Genex Cooperative Inc., IDEXX Laboratories, Northeast Ag Education Foundation, Pfizer Animal Health and Prince Agri Products Inc.

Source: Northeast Regional Dairy Challenge

National Dairy Shrine Industry Pioneers

Thanks to Mike Opperman, Charleston|Orwig, for sharing this special moment for his family since his Dad, George, was just honored by the National Dairy Shrine. Pictured are: Back row: Mike, Dave (bro), Don (bro), Micah (nephew – Mary’s kid), Bob (cousin) Front row: Kelly (Mike’s wife), Cynthia (Dave’s wife), Mike’s Mom, Jack and Maggie (Mike’s kids) Mary (sister)

The dairy industry is rich with history and brimming with leaders who shaped it, some in the limelight and others behind the scenes. Recognizing those individuals and their lasting contributions is a special privilege for the National Dairy Shrine (NDS). This honor is multiplied five-fold in 2012, matching the number of Industry Pioneers being inducted this year into the National Dairy Shrine Museum and Dairy Hall of Fame in Fort Atkinson, Wis. Nominated by NDS members and selected by an anonymous committee, portraits of each inductee will join those of previous winners on permanent display in the museum.

This year’s honorees are James Baird, longtime art director at Hoard’s Dairyman and creator of the original “Foster Mothers of the Human Race” painting of the five major dairy cattle breeds; Francis Eustis, a lifelong Jersey breeder, sculptor and creator of official “True Type” models for four dairy breed organizations; George Opperman, a longtime dairy farmer, Brown Swiss breeder and executive secretary of the Brown Swiss Association; Charles Plumb, a late-1800s champion of dairy cattle housing and humane animal care, and a visionary professor of animal husbandry at Purdue University and The Ohio State University; and Donald Seipt, a renowned breeder of elite Holstein cattle and former president of the National Holstein and Purebred Dairy Cattle Associations.

Read more about George after the break: (more…)

Charleston|Orwig Hoofs It for Charity at World Dairy Expo

The company that has been mainly responsible for our ability to cover World Dairy Expo year after year is Charleston|Orwig. This integrated marketing and reputation management agency has quite a few clients in the dairy business, including our marquee sponsor, New Holland. I spoke with Charleston|Orwig’s Mike Opperman, Sr. Director, Strategy and Planning, (left on the show lot with his client) to learn how the agency is doing and found out that they have a unique project going on here at Expo.

Charleston|Orwig announces that every step its employees take during this week’s World Dairy Expo will be for a good cause. The company will donate a penny for every step taken by each of its employees to Farmers Feeding the World. Given the massive scale of the week-long event and the dedication of its employees, the company anticipates a sizeable donation.

Every member of the Charleston|Orwig team will wear a pedometer to record how much he or she walks throughout the five days. The companies working with Charleston|Orwig at World Dairy Expo also are invited to participate in “hoofing it” or to match the donation.

You can listen to my interview with Mike here: Interview with Mike Opperman

2012 World Dairy Expo Photo Album

World Dairy Diary coverage of the World Dairy Expo is sponsored by New Holland

Cheese Waste Product Powers Utah State Dragster

A team of engineering students from Utah State University has set a new land speed record using a car that burns a new form of sustainable biofuel made from a waste product of the cheese manufacturing process.

“How many people get to drive a car they helped build with fuel they created from a living microorganism?” asks USU undergrad biochemist Michael R. Morgan, who drove the dragster across Utah’s Bonneville Salt Flats Speedway to its landmark finish earlier this month.

The Aggie A-Salt Streamliner, as it’s officially known, runs on yeast biodiesel derived from the industrial waste of cheese production. The sleek, Aggie-blue hot rod was among some 200 high-tech racers competing at the Utah Salt Flats Racing Association’s 2012 World of Speed event Sept. 8-11.

At its top speed, the Aggie vehicle clocked in at 65.344 miles per hour. At first glance, that speed may fail to impress NASCAR fans or even most interstate motorists. But make no mistake; it’s a head-turning achievement for a biofueled vehicle with a one-liter, two-cylinder engine. The USU team raced the dragster in separate runs, using petroleum diesel and the yeast biofuel, respectively. Powered with the latter, the speedster was able to match its previous petroleum-fueled run.

“Developing a biofuel on a large enough scale to run in the dragster was a tough undertaking,” says USU biochemist Alex McCurdy, a third-year doctoral student in Seefeldt’s lab, who is supported by a National Science Foundation research assistantship and is the recent recipient of a departmental environmental chemistry award. “It’s one thing to produce a small amount in the lab and discuss how it will work in theory. It’s another to actually put it in a dragster, while everyone watches it take off.”

Read more from USU.

Holstein Dairy Bowl & Jeopardy Results

Congratulations to the many competitors and the winners of the Holstein National Dairy Bowl and Dairy Jeopardy contests!

Dairy Jeopardy had nearly 70 contestants in three age divisions; Junior, ages 9-13, Intermediate, ages 14-17, and Senior, ages 18-21. The quick response competition is based on the popular television game show, but focuses on a vast array of dairy knowledge.

In the Junior division, first place went to Sarah Thomas from North Carolina. The Intermediate division winner was Megan Rauen of Iowa, and in the Senior division contest, Ethan Himmelberger from Pennsylvania took home the top prize.

In the National Dairy Bowl contest, four-person teams compete within two age divisions – Junior, ages 9-15, and Senior, ages 16-21. A total of 27 Junior and Senior teams competed this year.

For the Junior division championship, California faced off against Iowa, California claiming victory in the final match. Coaching the California team are Kirsten Areias and Megan Pierce, and team members included Bailey Allen, Alexandria Gambonini, Kiara Gilardi and Hannah Young. The runner-ups of Iowa were coached by Diana Stewart, with team members Alyssa Dougherty, Andy Dougherty, Adam Simon and Katie Stewart.

The Senior division saw the same match up with California versus Iowa. California claimed the national champion title in the Senior division with team members Caitlin Lopes, Tony Lopes, Elisabeth Regusci and Elise Regusci. The team was coached by Kirsten Areias and Megan Pierce. The Iowa team was coached by Heidi deGier, and competitors were Joey Adams, Kyle Demmer, Jake Mills and Rachel Scott.

Excellent sportsmanship is also rewarded in each division to encourage courtesy and friendliness throughout the contest. The Ohio team received this honor in the Junior division. Team members were Lukas Bishop, Kenzie Bishop, J.D. Nelson and Korey Oechsle, coached by Joyce Nelson.

The Illinois team claimed sportsmanship honors in the Senior division. Team members included Morgan Bollech, Matt Drendel, Levi Martin and Philip Shanks. The team is coached by Becky and Glen Meier.

The Dairy Knowledge Exam is open to any youth attending that National Junior Holstein Convention who wants to test their skills. The top three in each age division were awarded with a plaque.

In the Junior division, first place went to Mary Scott from Iowa; second place was Sarah Thomas of North Carolina; and coming in third place was Nathan Arthur from Iowa.

Claiming top honors in the Senior division was Tony Lopes of California; second place was Elise Regusci, California; and third place was Aaron Mitchell of Illinois.

Source: The Holstein Foundation

Holstein Junior Results

The National Dairy Bowl and Dairy Jeopardy contests were held in Springfield, Mo. at the National Junior Holstein Convention. Nearly 300 youth showed off their dairy knowledge.

Dairy Jeopardy

Dairy Jeopardy had nearly 70 contestants in three age divisions; Junior, ages 9-13, Intermediate, ages 14-17, and Senior, ages 18-21. The quick response competition is based on the popular television game show, but focuses on a vast array of dairy knowledge.

In the Junior division, first place went to Sarah Thomas from North Carolina. The Intermediate division winner was Megan Rauen of Iowa, and in the Senior division contest, Ethan Himmelberger from Pennsylvania took home the top prize.

Dairy Bowl

In the National Dairy Bowl contest, four-person teams compete within two age divisions – Junior, ages 9-15, and Senior, ages 16-21. A total of 27 Junior and Senior teams competed this year.

For the Junior division championship, California faced off against Iowa, California claiming victory in the final match. Coaching the California team are Kirsten Areias and Megan Pierce, and team members included Bailey Allen, Alexandria Gambonini, Kiara Gilardi and Hannah Young. The runner-ups of Iowa were coached by Diana Stewart, with team members Alyssa Dougherty, Andy Dougherty, Adam Simon and Katie Stewart.

The Senior division saw the same match up with California versus Iowa. California claimed the national champion title in the Senior division with team members Caitlin Lopes, Tony Lopes, Elisabeth Regusci and Elise Regusci. The team was coached by Kirsten Areias and Megan Pierce. The Iowa team was coached by Heidi deGier, and competitors were Joey Adams, Kyle Demmer, Jake Mills and Rachel Scott.

Excellent sportsmanship is also rewarded in each division to encourage courtesy and friendliness throughout the contest. The Ohio team received this honor in the Junior division. Team members were Lukas Bishop, Kenzie Bishop, J.D. Nelson and Korey Oechsle, coached by Joyce Nelson.

The Illinois team claimed sportsmanship honors in the Senior division. Team members included Morgan Bollech, Matt Drendel, Levi Martin and Philip Shanks. The team is coached by Becky and Glen Meier.

Dairy Knowledge Exam

The Dairy Knowledge Exam is open to any youth attending that National Junior Holstein Convention who wants to test their skills. The top three in each age division were awarded with a plaque.

In the Junior division, first place went to Mary Scott from Iowa; second place was Sarah Thomas of North Carolina; and coming in third place was Nathan Arthur from Iowa.

Claiming top honors in the Senior division was Tony Lopes of California; second place was Elise Regusci, California; and third place was Aaron Mitchell of Illinois.

Source: Holstein Foundation

Michele Payn-Knoper Speaking at Women in Ag

With unmatched passion and commitment to helping people understand the path from farm gate to the consumer plate, keynote speaker Michele Payn-Knoper will inspire the audience to build connected communities in the industry at the debut of the Women in Agribusiness Summit in New Orleans, Sept. 16-17.

Under the direction of Frances Pratt, co-chairwoman and event director from conference host company HighQuest Partners, the Women in Agribusiness Summit will bring together an unparalleled cross-section of women from the agribusiness and food production sectors. 

At this dynamic event, attendees will gain superior industry knowledge from highly successful stakeholders, share in professional and career path development opportunities, create key relationships with like-minded professionals in the sector, and promote the agribusiness industry to the next generation of women.

Payn-Knoper will address this extraordinary group on how to lead through the significant changes facing agriculture in the 21st century by relaying poignant moments, not only from her years of experience helping farmers in over 25 countries build connections that impact the future of agriculture, but from her years growing up on a farm.

Select Sires Conference a Success

More than 90 professional Select Mating Service™ (SMS™) genetic consultants from Select Sires’ member organizations across the country met at the 37th annual SMS Consultant Conference, hosted by Select Sires MidAmerica, Inc., and Prairie State/Select Sires in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, May 6-9, 2012.

To kick off the conference, genetic consultants participated in a day of continuing education to ensure that they remain a valuable resource for their customers. The group discussed the latest developments in the Program for Genetic Advancement™ (PGA™) and the many strengths of Select Sires’ current sire lineup as well as exciting genomic young sires that are waiting in the wings. They learned about enhancements to the SMS program, innovative technologies and recent trends and were introduced to StrataGEN™, a unique, sequential breeding system developed by Select Sires.

The role of the consultant is ever changing as are the needs of their customers. SMS allows consultants to help dairy producers control genetic recessives, haplotypes, inbreeding levels and provides a means to create custom selection indexes based on customer goals. SMS genetic consultants are trained to help their customers identify the highest ranking genetics in their herds for future development.

The most widely accepted mating program in the world, SMS continues to have persistent growth that is unmatched in the industry. SMS genetic consultants took the program to record-breaking heights in customer service in 2011. More than 5.48 million corrective matings were generated with more than one million cow-side evaluations, over 875,000 pedigree matings and more than 1.9 million new animals mated. For more than 35 years, SMS has been building better cows throughout the world with 80 committed genetic consultants whose dedication and passion are to improve the herds of Select Sires’ customer-owners.

To round out the conference, consultants spent three days viewing progeny of Select Sires’ current lineup and potential graduates in South Dakota and Iowa.

Source: Select Sires Inc.

Legendary Heffering Dies

Pete Heffering passed away on March 3, at the age of 80. Heffering was well-known in the dairy industry for his visionary breeding program.

Not only did Heffering win the coveted Klussendorf and Curtis Clark Awards for his achievements in dairy circles, he also had been inducted into the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame and Canadian Agriculture Hall of Fame. In 2004, the State University of New York (Canton) also recognized Heffering’s unique abilities when it bestowed him with its first-ever honorary doctorate in animal science.

Heffering’s achievements in Holstein circles were nearly unmatched. Over the years, Pete Heffering’s Hanover Hill Holstein herd earned 144 All-American and 90 All-Canadian nominations which resulted in 31 All-American, 33 Reserve All-American, 23 All-Canadian, and 24 Reserve All-Canadian award winners.

For six consecutive years, beginning in 1983, Hanover Hill was named Premier Breeder at both World Dairy Expo and the Royal Winter Fair. Brookview Tony Charity, the cornerstone, was four times grand champion at both shows and four times supreme champion at World Dairy Expo. The herd also has proven an impressive 177 bulls in Canada — including Starbuck, Inspiration, and Raider.

In 1989, Heffering took his animal breeding talents to horse racing and developed a business that easily matched his famed Hanover Hill Holstein herd. And as any Holstein breeder knows, that is a very big statement.

Source: Hoard’s Dairyman

Balance Amino Acids for Improved Production

For many dairy nutritionists and farmers, the next step to higher milk protein content is balancing amino acid levels in the herd’s rations.

When the ration’s amino acid levels are matched to the cow’s biological needs, the cow’s nutritional status improves. To achieve this goal, the ration fed typically includes a rumen-protected, metabolizable methionine. The most common result is an increase in milk protein, the best known benefit of amino acid balancing, according to Dan Luchini, Ph.D., Manager – Ruminant Products Technical Services at Adisseo.

Other benefits exist, though, he notes, such as increases in both milk volume and milk fat and a decrease in nitrogen excretion. To quantify the response to amino acid balancing in a single number, the figure for energy corrected milk (ECM) is often used.

Balancing amino acids supports more efficient nitrogen so less crude protein (CP) can be fed. Reducing crude protein helps reduce feed costs and makes room for more high-quality forage while decreasing nitrogen excretion.

In recent research, one group of cows was fed a 16.8% crude protein diet that provided an estimated 2,590 grams of metabolizable protein with a lysine to methionine ratio (Lys: Met) of 3.33. Another group of cows was fed a 15.7% crude protein diet that delivered 2,450 grams of metabolizable protein for a Lys: Met ratio of 2.98. The ration with higher crude protein contained 140 more grams of metabolizable protein, yet its amino acid levels were out of balance. Both rations delivered similar grams of metabolizable lysine. The ration with lower crude protein, however, provided six extra grams of metabolizable methionine from its 40 grams of dry MetaSmart, a rumen-protected methionine.

The cows fed the diet with the lower nitrogen load (15.7% CP) produced two extra pounds of milk with better fat and protein percent. They had a significant 3.5 lbs of extra ECM. They also had lower plasma urea nitrogen (PUN) and milk urea nitrogen (MUN) which confirm better efficiency of nitrogen utilization.

Source: Adisseo

Bozic to Present Two Sessions at Midwest Dairy Expo

Don’t miss two breakout sessions for farmers attending the Midwest Dairy Expo in St. Cloud Nov. 29-30, presented by Marin Bozic, dairy economist with the Midwest Dairy Foods Research Center. His topics, “Don’t Bet the Farm: Surviving and Thriving in Volatile Markets” and “Dairy Exports and Your Milk Check,” capitalize on his knowledge of dairy marketing.

Bozic is an assistant professor of dairy foods marketing economics in the Department of Applied Economics at the University of Minnesota, a position funded by dairy producers through Midwest Dairy Association. He completed his doctorate at the University of Wisconsin in Madison just before he started work in August. A native of Croatia, Bozic was selected by a committee of Midwest dairy industry leaders last spring. They had identified a void in the economic research available to the industry – one that could provide the economic analysis for developing and delivering dairy foods and ingredients to meet consumer needs, and drive dairy demand and consumption.

“The position is unique,” says Bozic. “Dairy economists usually work on policy or milk production issues. To my knowledge, this position is the only one actively working to find the right match between dairy products and ingredients, and the market.”

“We have many resources to help producers with the economics at home on the farm,” explains Ken Herbranson, chairman of Midwest Dairy Association’s Minnesota Division board and a dairy producer from Clitherall who served on the selection committee. “What we didn’t have was a good model to help us know if we’re producing the right products and dairy ingredients. We hope this new focus will help us to provide the economic analysis of these important market dynamics.”

Bozic is charged with capturing synergies between the work of the Midwest Dairy Foods Research Center, various departments at the three universities connected to it (South Dakota State, Iowa State and the University of Minnesota), the industry and producers. He’ll rely on an Economic Advisory Board to identify and prioritize issues, obtain research support and access, and evaluate results.

Source: Midwest Dairy Association

Northeast Regional Dairy Challenge Results

Morrisville State College hosted a successful Northeast Regional Dairy Challenge that drew 111 students from 12 northeast colleges and two Canadian universities to Watertown, New York on October 27-29, 2011.

This event marked the ninth annual Northeast Regional Dairy Challenge which is an innovative, three-day educational competition designed to prepare students for careers in the dairy industry.

Working in mixed-university teams of four or five students, contestants assessed all aspects of a working dairy farm, including facilities, nutrition, financials, reproduction, animal health and much more. Students collaborated on a 20-minute team presentation that detailed their observations and suggestions to a panel of judges and participating farm families. Teams were ranked as platinum, gold or silver based on how well their evaluations matched the judges’ evaluations of the dairy operation.

Teams, which were named after top sponsors of the Northeast Regional Dairy Challenge, were ranked as follows:

Platinum – Farm Credit, Maryland & Virginia Milk Producers Cooperative, Merck Animal Health and Zinpro Corporation

Gold – AgChoice Farm Credit, Alltech, Dairy One, Dairylea Cooperative, DSM Nutritional Products, Elanco Animal Health, Farm Credit Northeast Ag Enhancement, Genex Cooperative, Inc., Kent Nutrition Group and Select Sires, Inc.

Silver – ABS Global, Inc., Cargill, Inc., Cows Come First, Dairy One, Holtz-Nelson Dairy Consultants, New England Jersey Breeders Association, Northeast Ag & Feed Alliance, Northeast Dairy Producers Association, Shur-Gain, Table Rock Farm and Woody Hill Farm

Source: The Northeast Regional Dairy Challenge

Student Successful in Returning Chocolate Milk

Thank you Dominic Daoust, for advocating to keep chocolate milk in your school! This is a great story of one student’s journey to keep low-fat chocolate milk as an offering in his lunchroom.

Daoust, a senior at Niagara Falls High School in New York, told the School Board last month that the vitamins and nutrients in chocolate milk match those in reduced-fat white milk and the flavoring in chocolate milk is insufficient to cause any significant increase in obesity.

He cited research suggesting that chocolate milk has little or no adverse effect on health.

“A container of chocolate milk that a student drinks is more nutritious than a container of reduced- fat white milk that the student throws away,” Daoust told the board.

He gave the board a petition with nearly 1,000 signatures asking for a return of chocolate milk to school cafeterias.

After a few days to digest the student’s presentation, School Superintendent Cynthia A. Bianco decided this week to bring back chocolate milk.

About 20 students in the audience at the board meeting on Oct. 20 applauded vigorously when Daoust finished his presentation and handed the petition to members of the board.

“The removal of chocolate milk was due to an abundance of caution in safeguarding students’ health and an effort to provide only the healthiest choices of meals in the schools,” Bianco wrote. “However, Mr. Daoust, you have convinced me. I am satisfied that chocolate milk will not be the downfall of public health.”

Source: Buffalo News

Kietzman Wins Klussendorf Trophy

Congratulations to Joel Kietzman of Waunakee, Wis., was named the 70th winner of the Klussendorf Trophy, the highest recognition given to a dairy cattle showman in the United States.

The award is made in memory of Arthur B. Klussendorf, considered the outstanding showman of his time and a model for all those who have followed him. Kietzman’s selection was made by members of the Klussendorf Memorial Association, formed in 1937, at its annual meeting held earlier this week in Madison, Wis. He received the silver trophy designed by Tiffany Jewelers of New York City.

This year’s Klussendorf winner is an outstanding cowman and great cattle fitter. As a youth, he grew up with Brown Swiss cattle on his parent’s Wisconsin dairy farm. There, he bred and developed several All American Brown Swiss.

Since then, Kietzman developed an outstanding herd of Holstein cattle with a variety of partners. He developed a number of great Holstein cows into internationally recognized names. One of his first purchases was an EX-93 Holstein who was flushed to Walkway Chief Mark. The resulting daughter, Miss Mark Maui, went on to earn All American Junior 2-year-old honors. This young homebred cow eventually developed into an EX-95 2E Gold Medal Dam and Dam of Merit and was a foundation for a sale last month featuring 156 lots which averaged $3,625.

Just a few years later, another purchase led to even bigger things. After developing a deep respect for a young Conant-Acres-JY Broker daughter, this year’s Klussendorf winner and his partners purchased Krull Broker Elegance and developed this fourth generation Excellent into a highly successful show cow. And that was only the beginning. Since 1996, this EX-96 point cow and her offspring have accomplished some extraordinary, and even unmatched, achievements. They include:

• 34 Excellent and 33 Very Good daughters

• 42 Excellent and 126 Very Good granddaughters

• 44 All American nominations from the family

• 5 All Americans and 11 Reserve All Americans from the family

• And perhaps most impressive is the fact that this cow was the foundation for the world’s only progeny group to win the coveted Premier Breeder banner four times at World Dairy Expo.

Source: World Dairy Expo

2011 World Dairy Expo Photo Album

World Dairy Expo coverage sponsored by Charleston Orwig Dairy Business Association Alltech Hoard’s Dairyman Accelerated Genetics

Cellulosic and Corn Ethanol Production

Our latest ZimmPoll asked the question, “How many years before cellulosic ethanol matches corn ethanol production?” So what did you say? 42% said More than ten years; 23% said Five to ten years; 18% said Five years; 14% said Never and 3% said Next year. We’ve seen huge strides in the efficiency of corn ethanol production and research on the use of new feedstocks but we’re not quite there for mass quantity cellulosic production. Will we be? What do you think? Feel free to add your comments here.

Our new ZimmPoll is now live. We’re asking the question, “Which is more important to rural America: GPS Service or Broadband Internet?” We thought it would be interesting you get your thoughts on this in light of the Lightsquared rural broadband service that seems to pose some serious problems for GPS service. Your input and thoughts would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

ZimmPoll is sponsored by Rhea+Kaiser, a full-service advertising/public relations agency.


«Past Entries