World Dairy Diary

Family Day at the Dairy Farm Rescheduled Again

Screen Shot 2014-03-05 at 11.37.45 AMFamily Day at the Dairy Farm, the annual open house at the University of Florida’s dairy farm, has been rescheduled for Saturday, April 5. The free event runs from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The UF dairy farm is located 20 minutes northwest of Gainesville in Hague. Directions are available at the event website.

Originally, Family Day at the Dairy Farm was set for March 15 but had to be postponed due to wet conditions on the farm, said organizer Albert De Vries, an associate professor with UF’s animal sciences department, part of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.

“All the recent rain really soaked the visitor parking area, and we were concerned that cars might get stuck,” De Vries said. “We hope the rescheduling doesn’t inconvenience many people, and we believe it was the right thing to do.”

Family Day at the Dairy Farm includes opportunities to see cows milked, tour barn facilities, examine cattle feed, pet calves, sample dairy products, make butter, take a hayride, climb into a tractor and learn how UF/IFAS dairy research and Extension help the state’s dairy farmers produce better milk at lower cost and keep their herds comfortable and healthy.

New features this year include opportunities to buy refreshments, a seating area, face-painting for children and an information booth, De Vries said. There will also be a “milkable cow,” a mechanical simulator that enables visitors to get hands-on experience with traditional milking.

Opened in 1949, the UF dairy farm sits on 850 acres and is home to about 500 Holstein cows, which are milked twice daily.

Visitors should wear closed-toed shoes, sunscreen and hats. To protect herd health, pets are not allowed at the event, he said. Restroom facilities and complimentary bottled water will be available on-site.

Cameras are welcome, and visitors can post their Family Day at the Dairy Farm photos on Twitter and Instagram using the hashtag #UFDAIRYDAY.

“April 5 is our definite ‘go’ date, and we hope to see everybody out there,” De Vries said.

Not All Milk Protein is the Same

Until recently the A2 Corporation (A2C) operated exclusively in the Australian marketplace. Over the last 5 years a2 Milk® Australia has achieved 5yr CAGR of 45% whilst maintaining premium price positioning. a2 Milk® remains the fastest growing milk brand in the total supermarket milk category; it holds the #1 and #2 ranked sku’s and is circa 4 times larger than the entire organic milk segment in supermarkets. A2C now has operations in Australia, New Zealand, UK and China and is thrilled to be bringing new understanding and availability of the amazing health benefits of a2 Milk® to US consumers.

What is a2 Milk®?
– naturally occurring cow’s milk, not a product of genetic engineering or a technological process.
– recognized as being the original or ancestor beta casein gene in modern cattle. Originally all domesticated cows produced milk containing only the A2 type of beta casein. However, following a natural genetic mutation in European dairy herds, beta casein in conventional milk may now be present as one of two primary variant types, A1 or A2.
– the only milk that contains only the original A2 primary variant of the protein beta casein.

a2 Milk® is a tremendous opportunity to be part of something truly game-changing in the US market that is backed by an expanding body of scientific evidence and brought to you by a team with years of accumulated A2 know-how and an extensive intellectual property suite. We’re calling upon you to help us MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

Stop by booth #5188 at Natural Products Expo West (NPEW) on Anaheim, CA March 7–9, 2014 to visit and learn more information about a2 Milk® and the team behind it.

World Dairy Expo 2014 Honorees Announced

WDE_interface_2014_fWorld Dairy Expo (WDE) along with the dairy industry will honor four exemplary dairy leaders this fall at the annual Dinner with the Stars Recognition Banquet held in conjunction with the global event in Madison, Wis.

“Nominated by their industry peers, these leaders were selected for their outstanding contributions to the industry”, shared Scott Bentley, WDE General Manager. “Expo is truly excited to recognize them and share their life stories and impact with the dairy community.”

The 2014 World Dairy Expo Recognition Award honorees are:
– Dairy Woman of the Year – Pam Bolin, Beaver Creek Farm, Clarksville, Iowa
– Dairyman of the Year – James S. Huffard III, Huffard Dairy Farms; Duchess Dairy, Crockett, Va.
– Industry Person of the Year – Dr. Curtis P. Van Tassell, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Bovine Functional Genomics Laboratory, Beltsville, Md.
– International Person of the Year – Lowell D. Lindsay, Retired, Semex Alliance, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

These four award recipients will be honored at a formal celebration, including a reception and banquet on Wednesday, October 1, 2014 in the Exhibition Hall at the Alliant Energy Center in Madison. Tickets for this industry gala will be available at a later date.

World Dairy Expo is recognized as a catalyst for the dairy industry. More than 70,000 dairy producers and industry experts from 92 countries attended last year to experience the latest innovations and exchange ideas. The world-class event includes 2,500 head of North American dairy cattle competing on the famed “colored shavings,” more than 850 exhibiting companies participating in the renowned trade show, Expo Seminars, Virtual Farm Tours and exciting youth competitions. The 2014 World Dairy Expo theme is “Designer Dairy” and will be held September 30 through October 4 in Madison. Visit worlddairyexpo.com or follow us on Facebook.

Florida Dairy Farmers Release New iPad App

image003Kids, adults and educators alike can now learn about dairy farming in an exciting way through the Florida Dairy Farmers new iPad app, SunnyBell’s Florida Dairy Farm Adventure. The free app that can be downloaded from iTunes, is a fun, interactive romp through a Florida dairy farm.

SunnyBell – a little calf who longs to be an important part of the dairy farm, teaches kids about nutritious milk and where it comes from. The story is interactive and immersive, while kids learn about how a dairy farm works. The app also includes sing-along “moo”sicals, word-search puzzles, coloring pages and quizzes.

SunnyBell’s Florida Dairy Farm Adventure app is not only great for kids of all ages, but is also an exceptional educational tool for parents and educators, and uses games and songs to improve cognitive abilities in kids.

“The SunnyBell app shares the experience of life on a Florida dairy farm while reinforcing the message of where our milk comes from. Children are easily engaged, via educational songs and games that boast interactive animation, while learning about the importance of dairy foods in the diet,” says Alyssa Greenstein, registered dietitian with Florida Dairy Farmers. “As a registered dietitian and mother of three, I especially enjoy the fact that the SunnyBell app helps kids and adults separate nutrition from fads and misinformation.”

To download the free app, visit www.floridamilk.com and check out our new Kids Corner where you can learn, play and grow with SunnyBell.

It’s Fish Eating Time of Year

New Holland ZimmPollOur latest ZimmPoll asked the question, “What’s your favorite fish?”

Looks like grilled is a favorite by a landslide. Personally, I agree. I didn’t learn to like fish until later in life and still don’t cook it often, but love when someone makes it for me. It is interesting to see all the fast-food chains adding a fish sandwich to their menu this time of year. Maybe we should have added fish sticks to the list.

Our poll results:

  • Pan Fried – 11%
  • Deep Fried – 19%
  • Poached – 3%
  • Baked – 9%
  • Grilled – 35%
  • Smoked – 9%
  • Soup – 0%
  • Don’t eat fish – 11%
  • Other – 3%

Our new ZimmPoll is now live and asks the question, “What do you think of the Open Ag Data Alliance?”

The Open Ag Data Alliance (OADA), an open standards software project to ensure farmers have full data access, security and privacy, has officially been launched with the goal of enabling farmers to have flexibility and control over data-driven decisions on their farm. What do you think about it? Do you think there is a need for this – or do you even understand it at all? Let us know!

New Holland Livestock Pavilion Coming Soon

2013_NHAgNHC_logosIn support of their strong support of dairy and livestock producers, New Holland Agriculture & Construction is proud to announce an agreement with the Alliant Energy Center in Madison, WI. to secure naming rights for new livestock pavilions that will be built on the grounds beginning next year.

“New Holland’s legacy is strong in hay tools, tractors and skid steer loaders that dairy and livestock producers use every day,” says Abe Hughes, New Holland Agriculture & Construction Vice President, North America. “New Holland is thrilled to have its name on the buildings that will house some of the world’s most elite dairy and livestock animals these producers work so hard to raise in one of the most important states for dairy and livestock in the country.”

Construction of the New Holland Livestock Pavilion will begin in April 2014 with completion expected in September. When completed, the buildings will span more than 300,000 square feet and be home to a variety of dairy and livestock animals housed during shows and expositions held on the Alliant Energy Center grounds. This includes the cows housed during World Dairy Expo, where more than 2,000 animals come together each year for the world’s premier dairy event.

“The Alliant Energy Center is the place to be for premiere agriculture events—from the World Dairy Expo and the Midwest Horse Fair to the Dane County Fair,” said Joe Parisi, Dane County Executive. “We’re honored to build on that reputation with New Holland Agriculture & Construction. Partnerships like this one have been key to developing the exciting expansion planned for the Alliant Energy Center grounds.”

In addition to naming rights to the livestock pavilion, New Holland will also have an opportunity to showcase New Holland equipment throughout the year as well as have access to the facilities for training and a variety of dealer and customer events.

“We understand the value that the Alliant Energy Center brings to those who participate in and attend World Dairy Expo, but also to the hundreds of thousands of other exhibitors and visitors throughout the year who attend other livestock events, horse shows, county fairs and other activities,” says Hughes.

More Assistance From Cooperatives Working Together

CWTCooperatives Working Together (CWT) has accepted 12 requests for export assistance from Dairy Farmers of America, Maryland & Virginia Milk Producers Cooperative Association, Michigan Milk Producers Association, Tillamook County Creamery Association and United Dairymen of Arizona to sell 912,714 pounds of Cheddar and Gouda cheese, 1.355 million pounds of 82% butter and 606,271 pounds of whole milk powder to customers in Asia, Central America, Europe, the Middle East, North Africa and the South Pacific. The product will be delivered March through August 2014.

Year-to-date, CWT has assisted member cooperatives in selling 26.985 million pounds of cheese, 11.774 million pounds of butter and 1.305 million pounds of whole milk powder to 19 countries on five continents. These sales are the equivalent of 514.3 million pounds of milk on a milkfat basis.

In the long-term, assisting CWT members through the Export Assistance program helps member cooperatives gain and maintain market share, thus expanding the demand for U.S. dairy products and the U.S. farm milk that produces them. This, in turn, positively impacts U.S. dairy farmers by strengthening and maintaining the value of dairy products that directly impact their milk price.

CWT will pay export assistance to the bidders only when delivery of the product is verified by the submission of the required documentation.

Family Day at the Dairy Farm Rescheduled

Screen Shot 2014-03-05 at 11.37.45 AMNorth Florida residents can get an inside look at how dairy farms produce milk at the 2014 Family Day at the Dairy Farm, a free open-house event presented by the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences with support from Florida Dairy Farmers. The event will be now be from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 12. at the UF/IFAS dairy farm in Hague and is open to the public.

“This is our third year and we’ve planned to make this the biggest and best Family Day at the Dairy Farm yet,” said organizer Albert De Vries, a UF/IFAS animal sciences associate professor. “It’s a great way to learn where dairy foods come from, and it’s a lot of fun.”

New features for this year’s event include opportunities to buy refreshments, a seating area, face-painting and info booth. There will also be a “milkable cow” that will allow visitors to get a hands-on experience with traditional milking.

Attendees can also see cows being milked, tour the barn, examine cattle feed, pet calves, sample dairy products, make butter, participate in a hayride and jump behind the drivers seat of a tractor.

Opened in 1949, the UF dairy farm sits on 850 acres and is home to about 500 Holstein cows, which are milked twice daily. Florida is home to about 130 dairy farms and more than 122,000 cows, producing 272 million gallons of milk each year. In terms of the amount of milk produced, the Sunshine State ranks 17th nationally.

Students from UF animal sciences and veterinary programs work at the farm as part of their training. Many of the current dairy students and faculty members are presenters at the event, educating visitors at more than 20 displays around the farm.

“If you’ve never visited a farm before, you’ll come away with a better appreciation of the hard work that goes into producing food,” said Jerry Wasdin, coordinator of the farm’s research programs and services. “This is a 365 days-a-year commitment for our staff, and for all Florida dairy farmers.”

Visitors should wear closed-toed shoes, sunscreen and hats. To protect herd health, pets are not allowed at the event, De Vries said. Restroom facilities and complimentary bottled water will be available on-site.

Cameras are welcome, and visitors can post their Family Day at the Dairy Farm photos on Twitter and Instagram using the hashtag #UFDAIRYDAY.

Alta Seed Offers Forage Growers Additional Savings

FullLogo-AltaPlanting forage sorghum can save growers money in a number of ways, but a new promotion from Alta Seeds is increasing the savings. Growers can now benefit from lower input costs and improved water efficiency while taking advantage of an offer for a free bag of seed. For a limited time, growers may receive one free bag of forage seed with the brachytic dwarf.

“We’re so confident in the performance of our brachytic forages that we are willing to offer one free bag to all of our customers so they can discover how well it performs,” says Barry Lubbers, Alta Seeds director of sales. “Compared to corn, our brachytic BMR-6 forages offer significant cost savings, high nutritional value, drought tolerance and versatile options for planting and harvest.”

Forages with the brachytic dwarf trait yield well with high leaf-to-stalk ratios, multiple tillering stalks and superior standability. Brachytic forages average 6 feet in height and produce a denser plant than traditional sorghums because the leaf spacing is more compact. The brachytic dwarf plant structure alleviates lodging issues without sacrificing yield.

“The high water-use efficiencies of sorghum make it an ideal choice for irrigated or dryland planting,” says Lubbers. “Growing forage sorghum requires up to 40 percent less water and considerably less fertilizer than corn while sorghum seed is much more affordable.”

Growers can receive the offer for the free bag of brachytic forage seed through their local Alta Seeds retailer or by contacting Alta Seeds directly at 877-806-7333. The offer is valid until May 1, 2014.

Alta Seeds provides U.S. growers with the latest technology and advanced genetics in grain and forage sorghum. The Alta Seeds product line-up is selected from the vast germplasm resources of Advanta, an international leader in the research, development, production and sales of sorghum. For more information visit: www.AltaSeeds.com.

12th Annual Leading Dairy Producer Conference Hosts 212 Farms

PurinaCOW_LDPC 2014_065Purina Animal Nutrition and Land O’ Lakes welcomed more than 475 dairy producers, family members and industry representatives to the Kalahari Resort in Wisconsin Dells, WI., earlier this year for the Leading Dairy Producer Conference. Now in its twelfth year, it is one of the largest dairy producer conferences held annually in the Upper Midwest.

This year’s attendees represented 212 dairy farms and more than 145,000 cows. Guests had the chance to learn about a range of topics from heat stress abatement in dry cows, managing dairies environmental footprint to automated calf feeders.

“Each year our goal is to deliver the most innovative dairy nutrition and management insights to the most progressive dairy producers, as well as provide a discussion forum,” says Elena Lindemann, lactating livestock marketing director with Purina Animal Nutrition. “Dr. David LaCount, one of our dairy nutritionists based in Wisconsin, leads the selection of topics that are of key relevance for dairy producers.”

Dr. Bruno Amaral, dairy nutritionist with Purina Animal Nutrition, discussed the importance of heat stress abatement in dry cows. Amaral shared results from three University of Florida research studies showing cows cooled during the dry period produced an average of 14 pounds more milk in the first 30 weeks post-calving than heat stressed cows.

Insights on how to improve feed efficiency and lower crude protein levels in rations was shared by Dr. Andy Mueller, manager of dairy nutrition and technical support with Purina Animal Nutrition. Mueller shared strategies towards achieving high levels of production with low crude protein diets, noting that selection of ingredients is critical to achieving this goal.

Attendees also had the opportunity to hear first-hand from a producer panel engaged by Purina Animal Nutrition for their unique and hands-on experience with automated calf feeders. Pete Graff, Rambling Acres in Stetsonville, Wis., Linda Diederichs, 3D Dairy in Malone, Wis., and Chad Gullicksrud, Hamlin Valley Farms in Eleva, Wis., discussed management advantages they have found feeding with automated calf feeders, points of consideration while building and installing the feeders and noticeable effects on their calves’ development.

In addition to the educational seminars, attendees also had a chance to see first-hand the growth differences between two Holstein calves raised on separate feeding programs. Calf one was raised on a conventional feeding program while calf two was raised on a full potential feeding program. The calf raised on a full potential program weighed 59 pounds more and was 2.5 inches taller at 4 months of age. The calf raised on a full potential feeding program had an average daily gain of 1.57 pounds versus 0.71 pounds for the conventional. Calves were provided by Hanke Farms in Sheboygan Falls, Wis.

Purina Animal Nutrition partners with several industry leading companies to host the Leading Dairy Producer Conference each year and bring the most innovative research and information to attendees.

Majority in Ag are Boycotting Chipotle

New Holland ZimmPollOur latest ZimmPoll asked the question, “What do you think about Chipotle’s Farmed & Dangerous?”

An overwhelming majority said they have boycotted Chipotle and I am proud to say I fit into that majority. I also believe Chipotle should be ashamed and have decided I don’t need to watch their recent stunt to know they are bad news. Thank you to those in the agricultural community who have made a stand against this restaurant giant and joined the fight to tell agriculture’s story.

Our poll results:

  • Chipotle should be ashamed – 25%
  • Hilarious – Lighten up! – 6%
  • Thought provoking – 4%
  • Refuse to see it – 6%
  • Will never eat at Chipotle – 47%
  • Never heard of it – 12%

Our new ZimmPoll is now live and asks the question, “What’s your favorite fish?”

Today is Ash Wednesday and the first day of Lent. Many across the country are giving up something beloved to them in the 40 days leading up to Easter and reframing from meat on Friday’s. In honor of that we want to know what’s your favorite way to prepare fish.

CWT Assists in 3.9 Million lbs of Cheese & Butter

CWTCooperatives Working Together (CWT) has accepted 11 requests for export assistance from Foremost Farms USA, Maryland & Virginia Milk Producers Cooperative Association, Northwest Dairy Association (Darigold) and Tillamook County Creamery Association to sell 782,641 pounds of Cheddar cheese and 3.142 million pounds of 82% butter to customers in Asia, Central America, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. The product will be delivered in March through June 2014.

Year-to-date, CWT has assisted member cooperatives in selling 26.072 million pounds of cheese, 10.418 million pounds of butter and 698,865 pounds of whole milk powder to 19 countries on four continents. These sales are the equivalent of 475.3 million pounds of milk on a milkfat basis.

In the long-term, assisting CWT members through the Export Assistance program helps member cooperatives gain and maintain market share, thus expanding the demand for U.S. dairy products and the U.S. farm milk that produces them. This, in turn, positively impacts U.S. dairy farmers by strengthening and maintaining the value of dairy products that directly impacts their milk price.

CWT will pay export assistance to the bidders only when delivery of the product is verified by the submission of the required documentation.

North Missouri Dairy Day Scheduled for March 10

Milk producers across Missouri can hear updates on dairy law in the new farm bill—and a milk price outlook, Monday, March 10 at the North Missouri Dairy Day.

University Of Missouri Extension economist, Joe Horner, will present at the program which begins at 9:30am at Barton Campus of North Central Missouri College in Trenton, MO.

Also on the program is Ryan Milhollin, University Of Missouri Extension economist, who will discuss how to use pasture and forage insurance for drought protection. He will also share what he learned during the 2012 drought on small-scale forage irrigation.

Via webinar, Stacey Hamilton, MU Extension Dairy Specialist, will share innovations and research in grazing at the MU Southwest Center in Mt. Vernon, MO.

Rob Kallenbach, MU Extension Forage Specialist, will talk about properly growing and harvesting good quality alfalfa. And Joe Zulovich MU Extension Engineer will discuss cow comfort and cooling.

The day long program is free and includes lunch. Register by calling Hannah McClure at 573-884-6311.

BouMatic Appoints New Public Relations Manager

Boumatic_LogoBouMatic, the largest U.S. based, globally operating dairy equipment company, announces the appointment of Denise Behnke to Public Relations Manager.

“I am excited to be taking on this new role as Public Relations Manager for BouMatic,” states Behnke. “My background in sales and product management, as well as my daily involvement on a dairy farm, uniquely qualify me to promote BouMatic products and the BouMatic brand to the public. I am really looking forward to the challenge!”

BouMatic’s Marketing Communications Manager, Teri Weiss states, “We are excited to have Denise join our marketing team. Denise brings a great sense of relationship building to BouMatic. Coupled with her dairy background and product knowledge, Denise will be a wonderful ambassador for the BouMatic brand.”

Behnke has been a member of the BouMatic team since October 2011. She first served as the North American SmartDairy Sales Specialist, and for the last two years, as Product Manager for SmartDairy and Automation. Outside of her work at BouMatic, Denise farms with her husband on a 60-cow dairy located south of Madison, WI, and furthers her passion for working with both cows and people by occasionally serving as an official judge at Midwestern dairy cattle shows.

In 2014, BouMatic celebrates 75 years of helping dairy farmers harvest milk gently, quickly and completely. The company serves dairy operators in more than 45 countries and employs 400 people worldwide. Its global headquarters are in Madison, WI, USA. Its European headquarters are located in Remicourt, Belgium. To learn more about BouMatic, please visit: www.boumatic.com.

Opinion on Chipotle’s Farmed & Dangerous?

New Holland ZimmPollOur latest ZimmPoll asked the question, “If available, would you put E15 or E85 in your vehicle?”

Although for different reasons, the majority of you said you would use E15 or E85 in your personal vehicle if it was available. It seems the availability is the question. When will we see more stations carrying different blends of ethanol beyond the Midwest?

Our poll results:

  • Yes, if save money – 29%
  • Yes, supports USA – 31%
  • Maybe, need for info – 5%
  • No, have concerns – 14%
  • I already do – 21%

Our new ZimmPoll is now live and asks the question, “What do you think about Chipotle’s Farmed & Dangerous?”

Chipotle is at it again. It seems their is no limit to their extreme marketing tactics. Many in the agriculture community have voiced their opinions via social media and other online outlets. Has that made a difference? Are we preaching to the choir or are our words only reaching deaf ears?

Accepting Nominations For DCRC Reproduction Awards

two-cows-imageThe Dairy Cattle Reproduction Council (DCRC) has announced the 2014 Reproduction Awards program, which recognizes outstanding dairy operations for reproductive efficiency and well-implemented management procedures.

“Dairy producers continue to make significant advancements in their reproductive programs through new technology, teamwork and outstanding herd management,” says DCRC Secretary and Reproduction Awards Coordinator Dr. Andrew Skidmore. “We encourage industry professionals to nominate herds with high-caliber reproductive programs for the 2014 awards.”

Dairy operations must be nominated by professionals who serve the dairy industry, such as veterinarians, genetic and pharmaceutical company representatives, DHIA field personnel or Extension specialists. Nomination forms must be completed online and are due by April 15.

Judges will review applications and select the top herds, who will be asked to provide additional information about their operation. This information will help the judges select Platinum, Gold, Silver and Honorable Mention winners. Award recipients will be honored at the 2014 DCRC Annual Meeting in Salt Lake City on November 13 – 14, 2014.

For more information about the Reproduction Awards Program or to nominate a herd online, visit www.dcrcouncil.org.

The DCRC is focused on bringing together all sectors of the dairy industry—producers, consultants, academia and allied industry professionals—for improved reproductive performance. DCRC provides an unprecedented opportunity for all groups to work together to take dairy cattle reproduction to the next level.

CWT Assists with 5.8 Million lbs. of Cheese & Butter Sales

logo_cwt.gifCooperatives Working Together (CWT) has accepted 23 requests for export assistance from Dairy Farmers of America, Foremost Farms USA, Land O’Lakes, and Tillamook County Creamery Association to sell 4.791 million pounds of Cheddar, Gouda and Monterey Jack cheese, and 1.032 million pounds of 82% butter to customers in Asia, the Middle East, North Africa and South Pacific. The product will be delivered in February through June 2014.

Year-to-date, CWT has assisted member cooperatives in selling 25.329 million pounds of cheese, 7.276 million pounds of butter and 698,865 pounds of whole milk powder to 19 countries on four continents. These sales are the equivalent of 397.8 million pounds of milk on a milkfat basis.

Assisting CWT members through the Export Assistance program, in the long-term, helps member cooperatives gain and maintain market share, thus expanding the demand for U.S. dairy products and the U.S. farm milk that produces them. This, in turn, positively impacts U.S. dairy farmers by strengthening and maintaining the value of dairy products that directly impact their milk price.

CWT will pay export assistance to the bidders only when delivery of the product is verified by the submission of the required documentation.

New Holland New at NFMS

New Holland Roll Belt 560Robert Hendrix is the rock star of New Holland hay and forage tools. I had fun letting him show off a couple of new products at the National Farm Machinery Show, the Discbine 313 mower-conditioner and Roll Belt 560 round baler. In the interview below he talks us through all the new features.

Discbine 313:

New Holland has taken the Discbine® mower-conditioner to a new level with two new center-pivot models. Combining both speed and performance, the new Discbine® 313 and Discbine® 316 feature increased durability, more efficient crop flow and smoother, more effective conditioning. The combination of larger cutting discs and a wider conditioning system leads to cleaner cutting, better crop flow and more consistent drying. Co-rotating disc modules have been removed on the Discbine 313 and reduced to one pair on the Discbine 316. This greatly reduces the crop convergence between the cutterbar and the conditioner.

Roll Belt 560:

The New Holland’s Roll-Belt™ 560 5′x 6′ round baler delivers two elements cattle producers ask for the most: higher baling capacity and better feeding ability in a wide range of crops and baling conditions. New Holland’s proven combination of rolls and belts gets hay rolling quickly for fast, reliable core starts and helps pack more hay into every bale for less outside storage losses.

You can listen to the interview with Robert here and learn more: Interview with Robert Hendrix

National Farm Machinery Show Photo Album

Winners of Pennsylvania Forage Analysis Announced

pa dairy summitThe winners of the first-ever Pennsylvania Forage Analysis Competition were announced at the 2014 Pennsylvania Dairy Summit, held Feb. 12 – 13 in State College, PA. Three winners in each category were announced at the Dairy Summit, with the first prize receiving $1,000, second prize receiving $500 and third prize receiving $250.

Hosts of this competition included the Penn State Extension Dairy Team, the Professional Dairy Managers of Pennsylvania, Cumberland Valley Analytical Services, Dairy Business Communications and the Center for Dairy Excellence. Judges for the competition included Ken Griswold with Kemin, Ralph Ward with Cumberland Valley Analytical Services and Dave Pollen. Special thanks also go to the Lancaster DHIA for providing collection points for samples.

Winners and sponsors included:
Conventional Corn Silage, sponsored by Master Choice, Inc.:
- First Place: Mahlon King, Welshcrest Farm, Gap, Pa.
- Second Place: Walt Moore, Wal-Moore Farms, Chatham, Pa.
- Third Place: Clayton Shirk, Kutztown, Pa.

BMR Corn Silage, sponsored by New Holland Agriculture:
- First Place: Rick Cramer, Manheim, Pa.
- Second Place: Harlan Hoover, Oley, Pa.
- Third Place: Vernon Horst, Chambersburg, Pa.

Forage Sorghum Silage, sponsored by Alta Seeds
- First Place: Elvin Wise, Blain, Pa.
- Second Place: Paul Levan, Jr., Hamburg, Pa.
- Third Place: Duane Graybill, Thompsontown, Pa.

Mixed Perennial Silage, sponsored by King’s Agri-Seeds, Inc.
- First Place: Todd Welty and Rick Van Etten, Four Winds Dairy, LLC, Ulysses, Pa.
- Second Place: Daniel Good, McAlisterville, Pa.
- Third Place: Gary Kline, Y-Run Farm LLC, Troy, Pa.

Perennial Legume Silage, sponsored by Ecosyl Products, Inc.
- First Place: Jesse Bitler, Vista Grande Farms LLC, Fleetwood, Pa.
- Second Place: Jessica Peters, Spruce Row Farm, Meadville, Pa.
- Third Place: Alvin Jacob Peachy, Belleville, Pa.

Cool Season Annual Silage
- First Place: Marlin Hoover, Elliottsburg, Pa.
- Second Place: Danny Beiler, Christiana, Pa.
- Third Place: David & Doug Sattazahn, Zahncroft Dairy LLC, Womelsdorf, Pa.

For feedback regarding this year’s competition or inquiries regarding next year’s contest, please contact Rebecca White with the Penn State Extension- Dairy Team at 814-863-3917 or raw4@psu.edu. For more information about the summit, go to www.padairysummit.org or call (814) 355-2467.

Dairy, Beef Producers Get Free Quality Certification

BIVIlogoDairy and beef producers can get free quality certifications. Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. is offering to producers who sign up by April 15 free Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) certifications, funded by the checkoff and giving producers tools to provide the safest and highest quality beef to consumers.

BIVI will pick up the $25-50 certification fee for beef or dairy producers who are interested in becoming certified or recertified during this period. Visit www.BIVI-BQA.com to take advantage of the open certification period. BQA is important to the cattle industry as it gives producers a set of best practices for producing a safe and high-quality beef product. It also gives consumers the assurance that the beef they eat is both healthy and wholesome.

“Some of the challenges that beef producers face is having all of their employees become BQA certified,” says Dr. Jerry Woodruff, Professional Services Veterinarian with Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. “BIVI’s partnership with BQA helps offset some of those expenses, and we encourage producers and their employees to use the web-based training programs.”

The certification modules are customized for each segment of the cattle industry, including dairy operations. It covers best management practices, such as proper handling and administration of vaccinations and other products, eliminating injection site blemishes, and better cattle handling principles.

Last year, more than 3,500 producers signed up for and got the BQA certification through BIVI. More information is available at www.BIVI-BQA.com.


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